Democracy is Overrated

I keep tuning into these crazy debates going on across the country. Everyone seems to have differing views on everything from healthcare to other social welfare. I also thought about the incredible political gridlock that we have been in for the past X number of years. The nation is as divided as ever and, unfortunately, we have policies in place that in their current form are hurting American families financially. Nothign will change anytime soon.

This entire system is crazy, and quite frankly, STUPID. We have one level of government creating laws for over 300 million people in a country that is 2600 miles wide horizontally and 1500 miles vertically. A country where the culture and values of one side is vastly different to the other. A government that is creating laws on top of 89,000 other governments that are constantly creating there own. It is no wonder nothing can be fixed because we have created a system that in extreme conflict with itself.

Here is an idea. The federal government focuses on Defense, foreign affairs, immigration, and of course settle disputes between states (generally done by the supreme court). The federal government will be given limited taxation authority. If an income tax must exist it must have a cap that is low in order to allow states to adjust their according to the way in which that want to govern. State governments will have a greater focus on domestic/economic/regulatory affairs. If a state is more liberal it will have plenty of room to tax enough to finance it. If a state is more conservative it may choose to tax less.

These states may each develop their own systems of healthcare, their own education systems with more room to fund it without damning the economy. This is how it should be. This is how it used to be. We need a return to federalism.

Maybe chop up some states while we are at it.

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What if: A conservative response to mass shootings

It is noon on November 6th. President Trump and Prime Minister Abe are standing together preparing to answer questions from the media in regards to US-Japanese relations and North Korea. However, it is also the day after a terrible shooting in a church outside San Antonio, Texas. The President and his team are expecting to get some questions about the incident during this run in with the press.

The President finally gets the question about his response to the tragedy in Texas. He could give the typical talking points that every president uses after an incident like this. “Our prayers are with the victims.” “Thank you to our first responders.” But instead the President settles with something different.

“Everyone here knows that I am an elected Republican president and the very last thing I am going to do is call for more gun control legislation. No matter how much our friends on the left would like that. That’s just not going to happen.”

The president may seem frustrated. This is still the same year as the shooting in Las Vegas and only a few days after a truck attack in New York.

The president continues.

“However, in this age of mass shootings and terrorism, we cannot protect ourselves by putting down our own weapons. Gun control is an impractical solution in a free nation such as ours. Which is why I will be meeting with governors and law makers to discuss a conservative solution to this problem.

I hope that we can convince our governors to make it easier for the people to be issued concealed carry licenses. At the same time, I will be leading a campaign to restore the deteriorating gun culture in our country and encourage the responsible ownership of these weapons. In the wake of these tragedies, I still believe a better armed society is a safer society. Not only from foreign threats, but from threats on our own soil.

Thank you.”

 

If only.

Three recent Laws signed by Trump

While the media would make it seem that Trump has had no legislative accomplishments during his time as President, Trump has actually signed about 70 new bills since becoming president. Here are some more obscure laws passed by President Trump this year.

Dr. Chris Kirkpatrick Whistleblower Protection Act of 2017

Signed October 26, 2017

This law was actually managed to reach the media during it’s legislative attempt in 2015. The bill was introduced by Sen. Ron Johnson in response to the suicide of a VA Psychologist who questioned the over-medication of the VA medical center in Tomah, Wisconsin.

The Hill states:

The bill would require the head of executive agencies to notify the appropriate inspector general when an employee commits suicide to determine if the suicide was work-related.

The bill would also extend protections to probationary federal employees, which Kirkpatrick was.

Other provisions of the bill include making sure the Office of Special Counsel has access to all information needed to investigate retaliation claims, allowing for the removal or demotion of an agency head who retaliates against a whistle-blower, prohibiting employees from accessing other employees’ medical records and providing training to supervisors on how to respond to whistle-blowers’ complaints.

Women, Peace, and Security Act of 2017

Signed October 6, 2017

This law was actually introduced by Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen. It was a bill five years in the making and was actually a bi-partisan effort in including more women in diplomatic efforts around the world.

USA Today states:

Under the bipartisan Women, Peace and Security Act, by law it would be a core priority for U.S. diplomatic, development and military personnel to include women in preventing and resolving conflicts.

The writer of that article, Allison Peters stated in the title that signing this would make feminist history. However, it doesn’t seem like modern feminists have heard the news yet.

Elder Abuse Prevention and Prosecution Act of 2017

Signed October 18, 2017

This bill increased penalties on marketing schemes against senior citizens over the age of 55. This law came forward after Karl and the late Marlene Sibert of Cedar Rapids spent about $44,000 on nutritional supplements over 20 months for health and nutrition-related products when Marlene was hospitalized.

According to the article, the telemarketers had noted that the elderly couple suffered from dementia or “memory issues.”

 

Now these laws are not substantial but it does show that some things can get done in congress. Most laws passed outside the scope of the media. This includes all presidents before Trump. I’m personally a firm believer that laws should be narrower and shorter. What if someone merely introduced a law that eliminated one single tax from the Affordable Care Act? Maybe it would be small enough to fall under the radar of the Democrats and the media, allowing some non-Republicans(like Senator Collins) to sign it without the public abuse.

It’s only a thought.